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(llustratkd (Catalogue 



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FIRST AND BEST PEAS 

vi/ vt/ vf/ '1/ c^ rl^ ti^ 1 ) v> ^^ ^'^ ^'^ "^'^ 

Tarm and Garderi Stipplies, 

Agricultural Implements and FertUizers. 

■« • ' 

j()7 7ili STRIiIKr, X. W. 

()pp.>.5te Centre narket. WASHINGTON, D. C. 

TELEPHONE 1121. 






To OUR Friends and patrons. 

\\f \\) \1? VV \V Vf/ Nf/ Vf/ Vf/ V</ N»/ v'/ 

We desire to thank all our kind friends and customers for their liberal 
patronage and generous support, by means of which we have been enabled 
to build up our business to its present proportions. We will not in this 
catalogue pretend to give a full list of all the goods we keep in stock. It 
has always been our aim to handle '' ^/le best goods rather than the cheapest,'' 
and in this list we think we can show a line of specialties unsurpassed by 
any house in the country. 

We know that in these days of sharp competition, there is a strong desire 
on the part of the farmer to economize and buy at the lowest possible prices. 
This is well and should be done, but the '' lowest priced goods are by no 
means the cheapest," in fact as a rule they turn out to cost the most. 
Therefore, do, not be deluded into buying that class of goods, but buy good 
goods at fair prices : these we claim to have. 

Jn your persual through the following pages you will note that we have 
made prices to compete with the times. 

To those who have not as yet favored us zoith their orders. We want 
your trade, we will treat you right ; no order too small or too much trouble, 
send us a trial order, and we will use our utmost care to please you. 

To onr old Friends. We shall esteem it a great favor if all our old 
friends will continue to lend a hand by speaking a word for us now and than 
to their friends. We heartily thank you for past favors and hope for a con- 
tinuance of your orders, awaiting which. 

We remain, 

Yours to serve, 

P. MANN & CO. 

207 7th Street, N. W. 

Opposite Centre Market. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



WJiile many of the prices in this Catalogite cwe net, the most 
of them are merely List Prices and are subject to a discount. 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



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POLE BEANS. 

Add 15c. per quart extra if to be sent by mail. 
I quart to 150 hills, 10 to i j quarts to the acre. 

Culture. — Choose light soil, and make small hills 3 ft. 
apart, having previously spaded deeply and fertilized. 
Plant long poles two feet deep in the centre of the hills. 

Allot six beans to each hill, covering them barely be- 
neath the surface, their eyes downward Do not allow 
more than three to climb a pole, but remove extra plants 
to hills where less than three have sprouted. 

The Lima Bean is very delicate, and often fails to sprout 
from slight cause ; they should not he planted until the 
ground is warm, or started in hot beds and transplanted. 



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Evtra Sixe Larse liiiisa.— Large white bean, 
Very tender; used without shell; equally good in winter, 
/if soaked 6 to 10 hours before cooking. Pint 15c. Quart 
/25c. Peck $1 75. Bush. f6.50. 

'\^ King of Garden.— Large bean and pod; very 
heavy cropper. Pt. rsc. Qt. 25c. Pk. |r.75 Bu. $6.50. 

Speckeled IlortieuUiire, or Cherry.— Very 

productive ; equally good in the green state or when 
shelled. Pint 15c. Quart 25c. Peck $1.50. Bush. $6.00. 

DWARF BEAN CULTURE 

Dwarf Beans may not be safely planted until the middle 
of April, owing to the late frost, but may be planted 
thereafter, as desired, until the middle of August. 

Select high rich soil, make drills two feet apart, drop 
beans along the rows and cover with earth. Hoe often 
and keep earth to the stems. 

DWARF OR SNAP BEANS. 

Add 15c. per quart extra if to be sent by mail. 
I quart lo 100 feet of drill ; 2 bu. to the acre. 

GREEN POD BUSH BEANS. 

Earliest Ke«l Valeniiiie.— Is the favorite sort 
for growers who supply the early markets because its 
growth is so rapid, and because it stands shipment per- 
fectly. Canners use them for their packing because they 
are stringless and always tender, besides having beautiful 
round pods. It is a heavy cropper, and ready to pick in 
about 40 days. Pt. 20c. Qt. 35c. Gal. $1.25 Peck $2 00. 

Refugee Extra Early lloiiiicl Green Pod. 

Has a beautiful round pod of a delicate green color, which 
makes a perfect bean for canners and for shipping pur- 
poses. It is tender, stringrless and always bears an abund- 
ant crop Pint. 15c. Qt. 25c. Gal $1.00, Peck I1.75. 
Bushed 1:7.00. 

Dwarf Horticultural.— Dwarf Horticultural, or 
Dwarf Cherry, a splendid bean for use on the table as a 
snap bean or for winter use. It is large, meaty and meets 
the requirements of the markets, the table and shipper. 
Pint 15c. Quart 25c 



Special prices on any one kind of seed in large quantities 
All receive due consideration. We give the same at- 
tention to small orders as we do to large ones. 



POLE BEANS. DWARF BEANS. ASPARAGUS. BEETS. 




>^ c;dld<e:|i H ax..— jRust proof.. Very 
earl-y, tender and proltfiG^.^ .'Fo^l^s large, 
creamy yp^rw> ai;id strinj^less. Pint 15c. 
Ot.'25c. , Gal.|i.9p, Pecl^c, $r!75. Bu. #aoo." 



G-alloh 40c: ' ' Pe'ck ysC.' k 



IOC. Quart; 20/:. 



^ 



delineate 1 and 

Has g:reen 

,P,eck I [.50. 



( Hlx jVeeiifei— A' hibs-t 

early bean. None" better. 
po.d>f., Pi^VJSrCv. Quart, 2$c 
Bushel $6.00. \. I ' ' . , ■ " " 

i P;i:ol|fi'e ' <ji'eriii'siii -.^Waix.-^ piack 
Seeded. VVe are so thoroughly satisfied 
with thi? improved. .Strain ,of Black Wax 



BURPEE'S DWARF LIMA. 

This is a bush form of the well-known 
largtjt W|hit.e ,Lima Bean. It is very fixed 
in it^" bush clia racier, 'g*r6<vin'g to aLunjform 
htight of abo.ut, twenty inches, and forming 
a (tircular bush two to two and a half feet 
ini diajneter, yielding from fifty to two 
hundred pods similar to those grown on 
the Large, VVhite Lirna .Pole Beans, and 
contain. as, niany beans of/the'same delici- 
oiliis quality. (See cutj. Pint i^C Quart 
30c. Peck |i;75, , Eiuslie'l |7'.bo.' ' 



tha,t wej.havediscarded'the' old stock alto- 
gether, th'is being n\ore vigorous and far 
more procuciive, with a longer, whiter, 
m'ore .fleshy pod, ,Vine^ medium-sized, 
very ,viigprous ,and hardy. Flo\v'ers red-- 
dish white or, purple. Pods medium length 
borne wiell up^m'ong the foliage, curved,, 
cylindrical,, ■flej-l;iy, ap'd of a' 'dear, waxy- 
white cqI or, with, long, ^li^Vitly ctirved^point- 
remain a ilong tjme in condition' fof use as 
sna.ps.i iB.ean^ snf^all, oblong, jet'black. No 
one!can,affo|-d to'plarit the old Black Wax 
or Butter iBean,, ,as this' i^ rniidh better in 
every r^spe^t. Pint 15c. OuArt 30Ci. <j3.h 
lon$i.co.,,P^e,ck'|r.75.. ,''.^- , ' ' 



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CuLTURK. — Seed ( f Asparagus should be sown as early in the'.spring as the soil can 
worked into go d condition, q« 4he §ee4 geimjnates best in cool, moist wheather. 
Sow thin'y in_dti)ls,and vyhen well started thin ouVio three inches apart. In the fall or 
|k)llo\vni,g spring transplant to permanent' rows or beds, setting the plants one and'one- 
.'hall feet apart each ,w,ay. Soaking- the- seed, for tweaty-four hours in tepid 6f warm 
f water betore '^owing: will 'g:r^atlV 'assist gerhiination. iA,"p,a|Cket*' contains about three 
! hundred, seeds, andean ounce fli'teen hundred.. 1 •',.,! '" ' i * 

Use. two ounces of^seed i:o icio feet ©f. row. in seed bed,; two, pounds willproduce 
enough ro.ot.s to,^et one acre of land, one ' and la, half feet in row, rows 'foui'fe^t a part, 
or about eight thousand planfe'. ' One^ hundred plants will make a bed for'an drdinary 
amily.. .,■■,,., " ' '" ' ■ ' ' ' . \ ; _ .1 



Oz, ipc. 



lb. 26c. 



Pkt. 5c. 

by mail; .,^4,00 per 1000; 2 year 
sent by express at expense of purchaser. 



Conoi^er!S,.C<il,o,SS;J|l.— th'e standard' Variety." 
I'b 50C. I year old roots 50c. pier'io6 ; '906. per 100 if 
old roots. .50c per, ipp -^ I4.50 per 1000- 

1^^ '*«*•* *M^^ to. -T This asparagus Is now 'qiiiteejitensively- grown for, New York and 
Philadelphia, markets, whqre ^t sellsath^ghprites; 'owing to its fine size and regularity. 
Although of Southern' origin, it'is eqiially ^vell adapted to the North. , Pkt. 5c: Oz. loc. 

I i^ lb. 20c., ,^b.:6oc D^^...„ — . _u .. . . , 



Roots, 75c; pfer 'toa 

I > . Is.'' 



_ Culture.— Seed should be sown thinly 
]^ drills one-half to one inch in depth.-^,. 
Make the. fifst, sowing when the trees~-are' -' 
starting outan leaf and continue with addi- 
tional plantings every three or four weeks 
until August ist.s.o that a c6nstafit stipply 
ot tresh, teuder ropts ma^ be had'through- 
outthe season. Owing to the spongy char- 
acter of beel; seed/ the soil tdv^ringv the 
seedsljould l?e packed firmly^, either with 
the toot or roller, to in.4iire"prbper germin- 
ation. When the. young plants ar^ two or 
three mches.in, height they should be thin- 




ii. 



EQLI-PSE BEET. 

All. .-..' _ 'j^rl 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



ned to stand four to six inches apart in the rows. Those pulled out are excellent when 
cooked like spinach, or may be transplanted to other rows for an addit-ional supply. 
Seed may be sown also early in a hot-bed and transplanted to the garden when the 
season is warm enough. While we exercise the greatest care in selection of our crops 
for seed, ihe color ot the flesh in the early sorts will vary considerably with different 
soils and seasons. A "packet' contains about five hundred, and an ounce package 
two thousand seeds. Use one ounce to loo feet of drill ; four pounds per acre, in rows 
three feet apart. 




Burpee's Improved Blood Turnip Beet. 

The tops are neat and of uniform growth ; le^f stems 
and veins dark red. The Roots are rich dark red in color. 
Flesh deep red, fine grain, very sweet and retaining its 
bloo«i-red color when cooked. For a constant supply 
successive sowing of seed should be made throughout the 



spring and early summer. 
Lb. 6oc., postpaid. 



Pkt. 5C. Oz. IOC. 



lb. 20C. 



MANGEL. 

Oolden Tankard Yellow-Fleslie*! ^tlangel 

This distinct variety is a most important addition to our 
list of roots for stock feeding, as it contains less water 
and more sugar than any other mangel. A special fea- 
ture is ihe rich deep yello^v color of the flesh, nutritious 
and milk-producing qualities. Oz. loc. X lb. 15c. Lb 
30C. 5 lbs. or more at 25c. per lb. 

Champion YelSow, or Orange Globe Man- 
gel.— Productive, easily pulled, and an excellent keeper 
when Ftored in heaps for winter use. It is spherical in 
shape and is ot an orange-yellow color. The flesh of the 
root is white, firm, and suguary. Oz. 20c. X 1^- 15c. 
Lb. 30c. 

Improved Mammoth Prize I^ong Bed, 

(also called Xorbtian Giant and Jnnibo Man- 
gel). — The heaviest cropping and best long Mangel. 
This mammoth variety grows to an immense size, single 
roots weighing twenty to thitty pounds each, and always 
of very fine texture and good quality. Henry Hodgson, 
of Millersville, Ohio, raised on one acre 55.750 lbs. of 
roots, from seed purchased frorti us. Oz. 10c. X lt>. 15c. 
Lb. 30c. 5 lbs. or more at 25c. per lbs. 

Bed Globe Mangel.— This variely is valuable for 
earliness and smooth, symmtrtrical, globe shaped roots. 
The roots are about eight inches in diameter. Oz. loc. 
X lb. 15c. Lb. 30C. 



Please remember to Deduct 10 cts. per Pound from these prices, if ordered by e 



Early Bloo 1-Red Turnip Beet. The old stand-by 

Dewings Improved Blood Turnip. A popular strain 

Extra Early Egyptian. Very quick-growing blood turnip. . . 

Crosby'' s Egyptian. Beeis round and of better quality...^ 

Eclipse. Extremely early, round, blood-red beets 

Bastain s Ex'tra Early Red Turnip. Fine and early 

Early Yellow Turnip. Sweet, bright-yellow root. 

Bastain' s Half-long Blood, or Philadelphia Perfection Beet. 
Long, Smooth Blood-Red. An excellent late variety 



Per oz. 


K lb. 


$0 10 


$0 15 


10 


15 


10 


15 


10 


20 


10 


15 


10 


15 


10 


20 


10 


15 


ID 


15 



xpress. 

Per lb. 

|o 50 

50 
50 
60 

50 
50 

55 
50 
50 



All Garden Beets, in regular-size packets, 5 cents per packet. 



BEKTS. 



CABBAOB. 



CABBAGE. (Kopf kohl] 

Culture. — With a proper selection of 
varieties and a succession of planting this 
standard vegetable may be had in constant 
supply throughout the vear in all parts of 
our country. In Middle and Northern 
States seed may be sown in hot-beds and 
cold frames during Febrauary and March; 
when the plants are well started harden 
them off by giving plenty of fresh air, and 
they will be ready to plant in garden or 
field in April. By sowing seed of the early 
varieties in September and October and 
wintering the plants in cold frames, stocky, 
ha-^dened plants may be had which can be 
set out the last of March. For fall and J 
winter supply we sow seed in beds outdoors ^ 
in June, transplanting to the field during "^ 
July and the early part August. Seed 
should be sown very thinly in shallow drills 
so that the young plants will grow strong 
and stocky, — as slender, long-stemmed 
plants are of little value. A " packet " contains generally more than eight hundred 
seeds, and an ounce six thousand. One ounce of seed will sow 300 feet of drill ; two 
ounces sown thinly should provide plants enough for one acre. 

J All Seasons. — This is a splendid 
cabbage, suitable for fall and spring sow 




Selected Early Jersey Wake- 
field. — This is the very best conical 
headed sort on the market, it is extra early 
and always sure to form fine solid heads. 

The old reliable; unfortunately the great 
demand for this sort has brought upon the 
market large quantities of coarse and in- 
ferior stock, which has tended to diminish 
the popularity of the sort ; but when pure 
home-grown stock, such as we offer, is 
used, it cannot fail to give perfect satis- 



faction. Pkt. 5C.-10C. Oz. 30C. 
75c. Lb. I3.00. 



lb. 



Early Suminer.— This is without 
exception the best large Early Flat Head 
Cabbage. It is about to days later than 
the Jersey Wakefield and being over dou- 
ble the size makes it more desirable. 
Gardeners will find it a very profitable 
variety. Our stock is of the very best. 
Pkt. 5c 10c. Oz. 25c. X It). 60c. Lb. $2.00. 



ing, has large fiat, handsome heads and 
matures rapidly. Pkt. 5C.-10C. Oz. 20c. 
% lb. 60c. Lb. $2. CO. 



Succession.— This is a splendid cab- 
bage suitable for fall or spring sowing, has 
large flat handsome heads and matures 
rapidly. Plant Succession for main crop. 
Pkt. 5C. -IOC, Oz. 30c. 34^ lb. 75c. Lb. I3.00: 



Preminm Xate Flat Dutch.— 

This variety is largely grown for late or 
main crops, being the favorite market va- 
riety. Heads very large, solid and broad, 
with flat tops ; of fine flavor and quality, 
very short stems. Pkt. 5C.-10C. Oz. 15c. 
X lb. 40C, Lb. I1.50. 



\ CABBAGES.— 14 Well-known Stanard Varieties. 

Large Wakefield, or Charleston. Rather large and 10 days later. 

Earliest Etanipes. Small, pointed, extra early 

Extra Early Express. The earliest of all ; pointed 

■' Early Divarf York. Very early; small, heart-shaped heads 

> Large Early York. About ten days later ; larger in size 

Early Dwarf Flat Dutch. A first-class second-early ; round-flat 

Burpee's All-Htad Early. The best second early 

\All Seasons Good solid heads for autumn or winter 

Henderson'-^ Succession. A fine second-early ; of good size 

Stone-Ma€vn Marble he ad. A late drumhead ; weak constitution. 

Filderkraut^ or Pomeranian Pointed Heading. Hard for winter. 

Premium Flat Dutch. A well-known popular winter cabbage — 

Burpee' s Superior Large Flat Dutch. Am improved strain 

Large Late Drumhead. For autumn and winter cabbage 



Per oz. 


% lb. 


|o 40 


|l 10 


15 


50 


15 


50 


15 


40 


15 


40 


15 


40 


25 


75 


20 


75 


30 
20 


75 
60 


15 


40 


15 
20 


40 
60 


15 


I 40 1 



Per lb. 


l4 


00 




25 




40 




25 




25 




50 


2 


50 


2 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


I 


50 


I 


50 


2 


00 


I 


50 



L. 



p. : MANN; ^- CO., WAS-HIN-GTO^V D-. C. 



Ci^B BAG E.— Continued. 



y.ttk'},J^i!'i3^jlli,.„fiiu>-^ 



Hardly 'an\- ' other variety- 
ca'n approach the Surehea^'va. 
firie quality and uniform relia-r 
biiity in' fornlill,fi: so^id headg,. 
of good'size and' suberb qual- 
ity-- , 

Burpee's > Or i g i n al 
ISiiirelieftd Cabbage.— 
Produces large; round, flatten- 
ed he'^ds' of 'the- Flat. Dutphi 
type; and is' remarkable for jts 
certairity to headJ Itjiis-all 
head, artd sntie to head, .e.ven 
undet unfavorable conditionig.. 
The' headsare remarkiablvNun.-. 
iform, 'very hard,' firm land line 
in texture, and' ordinarjUv 
weig:b firom' lo' to- 1:^-; poqnds. 
eaph'. It'is^Veri}^ s^veet fiUMor-. 
ed, has' but few loose leaves, 
keej^'s' vVeH, i's- g-ood for s.hi,p-' 
ping, arid is j'u:&t the- variety 
and , qu'alit5'_ to suit markei 
gardeners, farmers, and all 
lovers of good cabbage, Pkt. 

'Ah ilUulration ajid directions far cjilture are printed on each package of 

the seed sold by us.. ^'•■■■'^'- (... .:<'--"■ . ,- 




'CA'P^FIOTS. '(Mohrq). 
'I'oz.'to f5olt. of drill. :2>^,lhs..tqAn,a,gre. 

. CuLTU^RE.— Follow. directions,giye,n . for 
Be^ts 'and Parsiiips as Lherei is Tno, differ- 
ence in ' the method, of cultivating these 
roots. ' F6r early crop.sc^W; in\Mf rch, for 
late crop in May oil June. 

» Ejr r 1 y v^.c,a it |.e t 

HoiMi.-^S^Taall bjiit early. 
Best for forcing. Pkt. ,5c.- 
loc. ;.j4^ilb.,2qc.; Lb: 60c. 



' Dan V e r-s' ^^ -H, a 1 f - 
long ,St limp il,o(>te<l. 

A new variety I of .decided 
merit;- rich, in color, and of 
hatidsome shape.'' Pkt. 5c.- 
'ioc.\ j+.lb ,25c. _ ,Llg. 60C. 

Daii-Y-e r s*- W^il f- 
loiig ' I*oiiit]ecl * Root. 

• Early and yery beautifully 
shaped ; very rich in color 
•and -best for, main crop, It 
is worthy; of .a, fair trial. 
Pkt. sc-ioc. : J4^ lb. 20c. 
■Lb. 60c. 




.CELERIAC OR TURNIP ROOT 
CELERY. ■ ^ ^ T 

3''ewJLarge ^ino6tll. -A new and 

quite disti'nct sort,: the' roots, bqing very 
smooth, large and.raund. . jThe, roots nia'y 
^bfe' booked' and sliced, and, eatjeij. with 
viilegar. •' I'^kt! 5C;-ioc. ,.0z.,i5c, X Id. 
40cr Lb. ?i.'5o.; - o . ., . . ' 

"corn SALID. (Ackersulat). 
3 oz. 01 seed to 100 ft. of row.' '^ • • '. 



L ,. 1 




Imprttve'd' \Long Orawge.— Deep ; 
orange color, long, STiopth, most popular « 
for general crop. - Pkt.-sc-ioc. )/ lb. 20c. 
Lb. 60c. ^ .... 



^ ^ Oz. IOC. X ^b. 20c. Lb. 6cc. 

/JX Special frices' 'oft' ainy^ cOxe v|^ 

jj^ lei fid' cif ■ seed'* i^r^.- la.r,ge . qu^ritir w 



('ABBA(^E. CARROTS. (ELEUTA(. (EI.RRY CAULIFLOWER. 



CELERY. (Sellerie). 

I oz. to looo plants. lo to 15 o/.. to 
the acre. 

Culture. — Celery seed may be sown 
during March or April in hot-beds. 
From middle of April or May seed may 
be sown out doors, for which purpose 
select a warm location, and light rich 
soil. Thin until there is a clear space 
between the plants. When the plants 
are six inches high, draw them, trim 
tops, place them six inches apart in 
trenches Shade until they begin to 
grow, and, if dry. water. Trenches 
should be ihree feet apart, four in 
ches deep, and nine inches wide. In- 
corporate plenty decayed manure at 
bottom of the trenches to a further 
depth of one foot, which may be done 
with a spade. Moist land, well enrich- 
ed will give the best results. After 
September ist, continue to draw on 
both sides rich pulverized soil to the 
stems, at intervals, as the growth of the 
plants indicates. This should not be 
(lone during rainy or hot weather. 
Kfep soil from the heart of the plants. 
At the end of October hury the whole 
in dirt, and dig up as desired for use. 

Iifii|>. White Plume.— An early 
self blanching variety, very popular for 
fall and early winter use. Pkt. icc. 



Oz. 20C. 



!b. 60C. Lb. «2, 



00. 




diisiiit iirolcleii Heart.— Same as 
the Dwarf, only the stalks are larger. 
Pkt. loc. Oz. 15c. 14 lt». 40c. Lb. I1.50. 



l>warf Golden Heart. — Very 
solid, an excellent keeper and of fine nutty 
flavor, the heart, which is large and full is 
of a waxy, golden yellow, rendering it very 
showy for either market or private use. 



Pkt. IOC. Oz. 



15c. 



lb. 40C. Lb. I1.50 



Ciriant Pascal.— The stalks are very 
large, thick, solid, crisp and of rich nutty 
flavor, free from any taste of bitterness. 
It blanches very easy and quickly, and re- 
tains its freshness a long time after being 
marketed. Pkt. loc. Oz.2oc. X lb. 50c. 
Lb. Ir.75. 



Golden Self- ISlaneliing. — A 

most valuable variety, which partakes 
somewhat of the character -of the celebrat- 
ed " White Plume " inasmuch as it does 
not require such high "banking up" as 



the ordinary sorts to be fit for the table. 
It simply needs a slight earthing up or 
handling. It is of a beautiful waxy golden 
color, very solid and of rich nutty flavor. 
Pkt. IOC. Oz. 35c. X lb. $1.00. Lb. I3.50. 



CAULIFLOWER. 

Culture. — Cauliflower is grown in the 
same manner as cabbage, but requires 
cool, moist weather and well enriched 
soil to attain perfection. It is highly valued 
for the mild delicate flavor of the white 
heads. 

Early Snowball. — Extensively ad- 
vertised, this has deservedly attained great 
popularity, and is now extensively planted 
Unfler favorable conditions nearly every 
plant will make a fine, solid head of good 
size. It is of dwarf habit, valuable both 
for early and late crops. Half-size pkt. 



15c. 
Oz. 



Pkt. 
^2.50. 



25c. 



lb. I8.00. 



oz. 75c. 



oz. I1.50. 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 




STOWELL S EVERGREEN SWEET CORN, 



CORN. (Korn). 

Adaius' Extra Early. — The hard- 
iest and earliest variety for the table use, 
it can be planted earlier than any other, 
but is not a sweet corn ; white, indented 
grains and short ears. Ear 5c. Doz. 20c. 
Pt. IOC. Qt. 15c. Pk. 50C. Bush. I1.75. 

Adams' Early. — A splendid early 
variety ; largely grown for early market. 
Ear 5c. Doz. 25c. 

Stowell's ETergreeii. — See illus- 
tration engraved from a'photograph of an 
ear of our improved strain. The seed which 
we offer is free from glaze and flint, and 
has been grown completelv isolated from 
.all other varieties. Its quali'.ies will not be 
found in the Stowell's Evergreen Sweet 
Corn as usuall}^ sold, which has deterior- 
ated generally both inquality and produc- 
tiveness. For canning purposes the Im- 
proved Stowell's Evergreen Sweet Corn 
will prove most satisfactory; its large ears, 
with long, slender grains, make the most 
saleable canned corn. Doz. 40c. Pt. loc. 
Qt. 20C. Pk. 75c. Bush. $2.50. 

Maiiiuiotli Eate. — This produces 
the largest ear of any, a single ear some- 
times weighing two to three pounds. It 
ripens a little later than the Evergreen, 



with larger robs, the kernels being flatter, 
not horse-tooth shape. Doz. 45c. Pt. loc. 
Qt. 20C. Pk. 75c. Bush. $2 50. 

Country Gentleiiiaii. — A new 

corn of merit and desirable for family use. 
The grains are irregular, compact and 
sweet. Doz. 40c. Pt. loc. Qt. 20c. Pjv. 
75c. Bush. 52.50. 

Stabler's Extra Early.— A new- 
variety, of larger size than usual for the 
early kinds It is remarkable for sweetness 
and earliness. A desirable canning variety 
D0Z.40C. Pt IOC. Ot. 20c. Pk. 90c. Bu. 
$3-oo- 

FIELD CORN, (Feld Korn). 

CrOldeii Beauty.— A large, broad 
grained yellow corn, with ears of perfect 
shape and very small cob. The richness 
of color and quality of the grain makes it 
a very superior variet}'. Ear well filled 
and very productive. Qt. loc. Pk. 50c. 
Bush. 51.^25. 

Hickory King'. — A large, broad 
grained white corn, and undoubtedly the 
smallest cob of an}' white corn ever intro- 
duced Qt. IOC. Pk. 50c. Bush. Si. 25. 

]tlarylaiid Wliite.— The most pro- 
ductive and showey white corn. Makes 
splendid meal. Qt. loc. Pk. 50c. Bush. 
Sl-25. 



D 




> 


o 



EGG PLANT. (Eierfrucht). 

Culture. — Sow in hot-bed, or in box or 
pots for indoor cultivation, early in spring. 
The plants being very tender must be 
sheltered from frost, but exposed so far as 
practicable to the sun and air. Early 
plants will be ready to transplant in May. 

Select light, rich soil, set plants distant 
five feet each way and keep well cultivat- 
ed. Where the plants are set, the soil 
should be highly enriched by incorporat- 
ing chicking manure some weeks previous. 

X. T. Improved Earge Purple. 

Oval shape, thornless, dark purple color 
and rich flavor. Our stock of Egg Plant 
will be found very superior wherever used. 
Pkt. IOC Oz. 25c. X lb. 75c. Lb. 53.00. 



CORN. EUG PLANT. ENDIVE. KALE. KOHL KABL CUCLMBEHS. 



ENDIVE. (EncHvien). 

I oz. to 20O feet of drill. 3 lbs. to an acre. 

Culture — June or July select a bed of 
iiood soil, drill fifteen inches apart, sow 
seed and cover lightly. The plants should 
not stand closer than twelve inches. Keep 
the earth to the stems, destroy weeds and 
hoe liberally. 

To blanch the pla its and destroy bitter- 
ness, when the leaves attain sufficient 
length, tie them closely at the top, while 
perfectly dry, for the purpose of excluding 
light and moismre, or cover with flower 
pots. After fourteen days they will be 
ready for use. 

Extra Orceii Curled.— It is the 

best. l^kt. IOC Oz. 15c. Xlb.soc. Lb. |2. 00 



KALE. (Blatter Kohl). 

jYz io 2 lbs. to an acre. 

Culture — Sow in drills or broadcast, 
in the fall or spring. It will mature with- 
out further attention unless wetds get the 
start, when the la'ter must be removed 
and the earth loosened. 

Curled German. — Curly, dwarf, 
hardy and a rapid grower. Pkt. 5c. % lb. 
20C. Lb. 75c 




Broad lioudon. or targe 
Anierieau Flag. — Best American- 
grown seed. Pkt. 5c. O2. 15c. % lb. 
i-b. |r.2o. 



BORE COLE. 

This is sown in May and transplanted 
like cabbage, nicely curled and hearty. 
Frost improves it. Pkt. 5c. Oz. loc. Lb. 
6oc. 



(Kohl-Rabi). 

I \4 lb. to the acre- 



KOHL-RABI. 

I oz. to 200 ft. of drill. 

Culture. — Sow in April in rows eight" 
een inches apart, thinning out to eight 
inches between plants. 

Early While Vienna— This forms 
a bulb above grouud, and its flavor ming- 
les the peculiarities of the cabbage and 
turnip. Pkt. loc. Oz. 20c. ]4- lb- 5°^. 
Lb. $1.75. 



CUCUMBER. (Gurke). 




I oz. to 50 hills. 
2 lbs. to an acre. 



I to 



35 c. 



Culture. — For the 
growth of cucumbers 
hills are raised, stand- 
ing five feet apart. 
Quite rich, sandy soil is 
best. If necessary en- 
rich the hills with a mix- 
ture of sandy soil and 
strong rotten manure. 
For early use, plant in 
May ; for pickling, plant 
in June or July. Eight 
or ten seeds should be 
allowed to each hill as 
the young plants are of- 
ten destroyed by bugs. 

Soon as the plants at- 
tain vigor, thin them, 
leaving the three most 
promising if practicable 
water during the 
drought, keep soil loose 
and free of weeds. 

Jersey Pickling.— The best gen- 
eral crop pickle. Pronounced by growers 
to be a perfect pickle in every respect, be- 
ing very productive ; a deep green color. 
Ithasnorival. Pkt. 5c. ^Ib. 15c. Lb. 50c. 

Evergreen White Spine.— This 
valuable variety differs from the ordinary 
White Spine in holding its deep green 
color much longer. It is also earlier and 
more productive. The flavor is delicious, 
the flesh being unusually tender and crisp. 
Pkt, 5c. -IOC. % lb. 15c. Lb. 50c. 

Peerless or Improved White 

Spine.— Early and productive. Medium 
to large size. Pkt. 5c. X lb. 15c. Lb. 50c. 
liOng Green.— Large, green and de- 
sirable for slicing. (See cut). Pkt. 5c. 
% lb. 15c. Lb. 50c. 

Gerkin or Burr. — Used only for 
pickling. Pkt. 5c. Oz. loc. 



lO 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C 



I .oz. to 3000 plants. 
3 lbs. to acre. 

Culture. — Sow in 
hot-bed or the open 
ground during- April 
and May for summer 
supply. Plants may 
be grown on a tem- 
porary bed and trans- 
planted ; or the seed 
may be sown where 
the lettuce is to ma- 
ture. For a perman- 
ent bed, select rich 
light soil, spade 
deeply, incorparaie 
manure and lay off in 
drills two feet apart. 
Destroy weeds and fc 
hoe often. Seed may ^ 
be sown in August 
and September, and 
plants treated as di- 
rected for cabbage 
plants, in which case 
a covering of straw 
will prove very ben- 
eficial. 



LETTUCE. 



(Lattich) 




SalaiiiaiKler.— ^. 5" 

der heads, resisting summer heat 
15c. % lb. 35c. Lb. $1.25, 



SALAMANDER LETTUCE. 

Compact ten- ! Iiuproved Hanson. — One of the 



]Vew Iceberg. — Quick growing. 
Heads hard and handsome. Tender and 
true. There is no handsomer or more solid 
Cabbage Lettuce m cultivation — in fact, it 
is strikingly beautiful. The large, curly 
leaves which cover the outside of the h-ad 
are of a bright, light green. The unusually 
solidity of the heads is insured by the 
large, white main ribs of the leaves, each 
of which curving strongly into the center, 
acts like a truss, making it impossible for 
the leaves to open outward and expose the 
center, which, consequently, is thoroughly 
blanched, it matters not whether in the 
early spring or the hottest days of summer, 
the leaves are always crisp and tender. 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. 15c. )i lb. 40C. Lb. $1.50 
Postpaid. 

Pliilaclelpliia Bntter. — A very 
early lettuce, excellent for forcing. Pro- 
duces large heads of excellent quality ; 
one of the best for market gardeners. Pkt. 
5c. Oz, 15c. % lb. 40c. Lb. $1.25. 

Wliite liOaf. — Large solid heads, for 
frames or outdoor ; best of all for market 



gardeners. 
Lb. $r. CO. 



Pkt. 5c. Oz. 15c. 



lb. 



Preminui Cabbage Head. — 

Pkt. 5c. Oz. 15c. % lb. 30c. Lb. Ii.oo. 



Oz. finest. Heautifui frmged hrad. Pkt. 5c. 
Oz. J5C. % lb. 35c. Lb. $[ 00. 

I>eJianee Snninier.— This is tie 
most remarkable ietta( e for resisting the 
summer's heat. It makes a firstcjass heat! 
and retains its marketable condition long 
after other sorts become worthless, Pkt. 
5:. Oz. 15c. % lb. 30C. Lb. ^[.00. 

Big Hosion. — Identi al in color, 
shape and general appear-ince as the Bos- 
ton Market Lettuce, but double the size. 
It is about one week later in mpturins:, but 
its solidity and greater size of head will 
make it a most valuable sort, desirable 
either for cokl frames or open ground 
planting. It heads up well all seasons of 
the year, and is of crips, tender quality. 
Pkt. '5c. Oz. 15c. ^i lb. 40C. Lb. |[.5o. 

Boston ]?Iarkct or Tennis 
Ball. — This variety is used specially for 
green house and hot bed culture, because 
it can be planted very close. It grovv> very 
compact, fair size, heads slightly tinged 
with red on edge of leaves. Pkt 5c Oz. 
15c. )i lb. 40C. Lb. ^[.00. 

Golden Qneen (Early Egg.'— 

W. S Popular for forcing. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 

15c. 34: lb. 35c. Lb. ir.25. 

Early Prize Head.— Large, loose 
heads, tinged with brown; fine flavor. 
Pkt. 5C. Uz. 15c. % lb 35c. Lb. I1.25. 



^oc. 



IvBTttltce:. 



CANTAIvOlJRKS. 



I I 



CANTALOUPE. (Zucker Melone. 





Per oz. 



ro 



ACME OR BALTIMORE CANTALOUPE. 

A first-class melon : has size, form, beauty and rich in flavor. Why grow a poor 
crop when a small outlay for good seed will assure a splendid crop of choistest fruit, 
which will command the highest prices and ready sales? Our seed this year is from 
the best crop we ever grew, and with our seed your crop may be equally as good. 
The best of all for market purposes. Our seed is from the finest stock known, and has 
always given saiisfaction. Pt. 5c. Oz loc. ^ lb., 20c. Lb. 50c. 

Musk Melon, or Cantaloupes. 

Burpee' s Netted Gem. 

or Rocky Ford. See 

next page 

Reedland Giant. A 
long showy ; green 
flesh 

New Superb. A hand- 
some late melon; 
sweet green flesh. ... 

Green-flesh Osage. Pea- 
green flesh, of delici- 
ous flavor 

Delnionico. Oval shape 
heavily netted; 
orange-pink flesh .... 

Superior. Round, den- 
sely netted; sweet 
light-green flesh 

P r o I ifi c Nutmeg. 
^^^„ . Round, heavily netted; 

EXTRA EARLY HACKENSACK. ^hick green flesh 

Hackensack, or Turk's Cap. Large, round; flattened, green flesh. 

Extra Early Hackensack. Ten days earlier than the proceeding. . 

Perfection, or Princess. Nutmeg shape, netted; sweet salmon flesh 

I he Banquet. Densely netted, gobular; dark, rich salmon flesh... 

/ erfected Dclmouco. More uniform in shape ; better flavor. 

Acme, or Ba/timore. Oblong, pointed ; light-green flesh 

Boston Mango. Useless as fruit, but the very best for ''Mangoes.'\ 

In regular-size packets, each of the above, 5 cents per packet. 



ic 



ic 



10 



10 



10 



10 

10 
10 
ro 
10 
10 

ID 
10 



% 


lb 


Pel 


•lb. 


$0 


25 


$0 


85 




20 




65 




20 




65. 




20 




65 




20 




60 




20 




60 




20 




60 




20 




60 




20 




65 




20 




60 




20 




60 




20 




60 




20 




SO 




20 




60 



12 



P. MANxN & CO., WASHINGTON, D, C. 



WATERMELON. (Wassermelone). 

Culture. — Prepare hills in they same manner as for musk melons, but to accommo- 
date the larger growth of vine the hills; should be eight to nine feet apart each way. 
Plant the seed as soon as the temperature remains above sixty degrees all night, and 
when vines are well started thin out to one or two plants in a hill When vines are 
three feet in length pinch off the tips to cause them to throw out laterals. 

According to size of seeds, a " packet " contains from 60 to 140, an ounce from 240 to 
600. Use four ounces of seed to 100 hills ; three pounds per acre. 



Burpee's Cuban Queen. — This magnificent melon from the 
was first .brought prorninently before the public by us in 188 r. ■ The skiii'i 
striped, dark and lightgreen. The flesh is bright red, remarkable firm, 
the rind is quite, thin for so large a melon. Pkt. 5c.' Oz. loc. ''j4 lb. 20c. 



West Indies 
s beautifully 
lucious, and , 
Lb. 6qc. 



Per 

$0 



If ordered by express, deduct to cents per pound. 

Phinney's Early. A firstclass, extra earfy ; of medium size 

Vick's Early. Extra early ; oblong *; skin varies in color 

Dark Icing, or Ice Rind. Of round form:; sugary flavor :'. . ... . . 

Sweet Heart. Oval form ; mottled lieht-green skin ;■ red 'flesh. . . 
Duke Jones. A famouse new Southern melon, introduced in r895 

Florida Favorite. An oblong melon, of fine flavor. .•....• '. . - 

Girardeau' s Nezv Favorite. An improved Florida favorite 

Pride of Georgia. Round in shape ; skin striped. ...;..•.;'...... 

ScDiijiole. Similar to Jordan's Gray Monarch. ....:.. 

Ice Cream, or Peerless. True white-seeded ; oblong, luscious.. . 
Red-Seeded, Vaucluse. Of elongated egg-shaps ; superb quality.. 
Kolb's Gem. The ^reat market melons' carries well, but poor 

flavor.. , >..'.■.; ...■. .....: 

The Boss. A fine, oblong melon ; of small size ; good flavor. . . . 

Kentucky. Wonder. A pooular market melon in the West. .'. ..... 

Striped Gypsy , ox Georgia Rattlesnake. A large, oblong melon 
The Jones. A grear favorite iff the South ; rich flavor;. .'-.::.'... ' 
Ruby-Gold. Flesh yellow, markediwith red ; not recommended; ■ 

Colorado Preserving. The best for citron preserves. . . . .:. : 

Each of the above Waterrii'eloris, 5 cents per packeX.. 



oz. 

10 
10 

=IO' 
10' 
10 
10 
TO 
10 
10' 
10' 

10 

1 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



K lb. 

$o- 20 
20' 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 

20 

20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



Per lb. 
^O 55 
55. 
55^ 
60' 

65 
60 

60 

60 

' 60 

50 
60 

50 

'' 50 
60 

50 
60 
60 
60 



ONIONS. (Zwiebel). 

Culture. — To raise Onion Sets, during 
March or April select, good soil and mark 
shallaw (dnlls, one foot apart, along which 
sow seeds thickly. Keep the beds free 
from weeds. , In July, the bulbs will be the 
size pf marbles, when they are taken up 
and spread, thinly over a floor, securely 
protected ifrom dampness andfexposed to 
the air, : ; , ^ . . < 

To raise large Onions, select a bed of 
rich soil, work it deeply and add decayed 
manure plentifully, level the bed and mark 
drills one inch deep and one foot apart. 
Place the rqots of the sets about six inches 
apart in. tjiese drills. Keep the soil loose 
and Xrqe of weeds. ? , . . ,; .1,, 

Another process is sometimes adopted 
to rais.e Onions from the seed during one' 
year, Jn the, spring, prepare the bed as 
indiqated and sow thinly along the drills. 
Be sure t,o,have the soil very rich. Keep 
it fr^e of weeds, hoe often and thin out if 
the>^ crowd each other. 




;'/Cv y- 



White SllTer Skin.— The leading 
sort of white "onion. ' Skin is of a beautiful, 
clear white color ; flavor mild, and a most 
excellent keeper. (See cut). Pkt. 5c. 
Oz. 25c. X lb- 75c. Lb..|2.5o. 

White Portugal.— Pure white skin. 
Oz. 35c. ]4 lb. 80C. Lb. I3. 00. ' " 



W^ AT Je R IVI KL.O XS. 



ONIONS. 



PBPPKR. 



13^ 



ONIONS. —Continued. 

Prizetaker; — This is the larg-e beau- 
tiful onion that is seen every fall offered 
fgr sale at the fruit stores in Baltimore and 
other large cities. They are a rich straw 
color and of enqrmous size. Although of' 
such large size it is very hardy and an ex- 
cellent keeper. The flavor is mild and 
delicate, making the Prizetaker a favorite 
variety for salad. Oz. 15c. X lb. 4qc; 
Lb.J1.50. 




Yellow Globe Daiiveis.— Yellow 
skjn, mild fine flayor, and very hardy. 
O4 15c. K lb, 40C. Lb. |[.50. 

Strawshiirg or Yellow Diitcli^ 

The most popula;- variety for sets. Sels 
grow round and plump with bright yellow 
skin, flesh, pure white, mild flavor, and an 
excellent keeper. Oz. 15c. }4 lb. 40c* 
Lb I1.50. 

Onion Sets.— White', and yellow at 
Lowest Prices. 




PARSNIP. (Pastinate). 

I oz. will .«:OW 100 ft. Ot 

drill, 5"lbs. required to an 
acre. 

Culture. — Deep mel- 
low soil iii necessary for 
the full developem^nt of 
the Hollow Crown Pars- 
nip, because the truest 
type of Hollow Crown 
will show a high Crqwn 
when grown in stiff soil. 

Sow as early in the 
spririg as the wheather 
will permit, in drills 15 in- 
ches apart, covering the 
seed j4 of an inch deep ; 
when well up, thin out to 
5 or 6 inches apart in the 
rows. Parsnips are im- 
proved by frost, and it is a 
usual custom to take up in 
the fall a certain quantity 
for winter Use, leaving the 
rest in the ground until 
spring, to be dug as re- 
quired. Aside from the 
value of the parsnip as a 
table vegetable, is is also 
one of the best roots for 
cultivation for farm pur- 
poses, furnishing a very 
nourishing food, particu- 
larly adapted to, and re- 
lished by dairy stock. 

Hollow Crown Sngar.-^This is 
the finest stock in cultivation. Deep hoL 
low crown; delicate flavor, tender and 
smooth. (See cut). ' Pkt, 5c, X lb. 20c. 
Lb. 50c,. 

PEPPt'^R. (Pfefifer). 
4 oz. to an acre. 

Culture. — In March' or April 'sow Tn a 
hot-bed or in a box for in-door attention, 
eicposing the plants to the light, or air, as 
much as is practicable. In six weeks they 
will be ready for transplanting. Select 
good soil and set the plants twelve itiches 
apart in rows which should be two feet a- 
part. Cultivate with hoe, and draw soil 
to the stems. Seed may be sown out- 
doors in May. 

Rnby ' King.^Beautiful red color, 
mild and pleasant in flavor, very produc- 
tive, can be used as a salad, and the best 
sort for Mangoes. Pkt. 5c. Oz. ^50. X 
lb. 75c. Lb, I2.50. 

Bull Nose or Bell.— Large ribbed 
acrid ; best for pickling. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 25c. 
X lb. 75c. Lb. I2.50. 

Cayenne. — Red pods, small and 
acrid. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 25c. 



H 



P. MANN & CO. WASHINGTON, D. C. 




PARSLEY. (Petersille.) 
Culture. — Seed should be sown thinly 
in drills as early in the spring as the soil 
can be dug in fine loose condition, as it ger- 
minates best during cool moist weather. 
When well started thin out or transplant 
to stand six inches apart in the row. The 
dwarf, moss-curled varieties make beauti- 
ful edgings for the garden beds when 
planted along the walks, and furnishes or- 
namental foliage lor garnishing as well as 
seasoning for table use. Roots may be 
taken up and planted in boxes or flower 
pots in the fall for wimer use and placed 
in a sunny window in the kitchen. As 
plants run to seed early in the spring the 
second year, fresh plantings should be 
made each season. A " packtt " contains 
about 3000, and an ounce 15,000 s-eds. 
Use one-half ounce to 100 feet of drill. 

Plain or il^iiigle. — Plain leaves, 
excellent flavor. Pkc. 5c. Oz. loc, X lb. 
20c. Lb. 55c. 



Fine Double € u r 1 e d.— Fine, 
dwarf, crimped leaves. Pkt, 5c. Oz. loc. 
M lb, 20c. Lb. 55c, 

Fxtra-Curled I>warf or Emer- 
ald. — This is a most beauiiful and valua- 
ble variety The moss-like leaves, of a 
handsome bright green color, are finely- 
crimped and curled. For garnishing, no 
variety is more attractive. Pkt. 5c. Oz, 
IOC. X lb. 20C. Lb. 65c. Postpaid. 

Extra ]>ark Moss Cnrled.— 

This is very ornamental m growth, more 
so than many plants grown for decorative 
purposes The leaves are of a peculiar, 
extra dark-green color. It is very produc 
tive, and from the densely curled charac- 
ter of its leaves a quantity for green sea- 
soning or garnishing can be gathered in 
less time than with ttie more v)pen-lea\ed 
varieties. Pkt. 5c, Oz. loc. % lb 25c. 
Lb. 75c. 

PUMPKIN. (Kurbis). 

10 bs to an acre. 

Culture. — Plant in May in hills eight 
feet apart. Allot ten seeds to each hill, as 
bugs often destroy the >oung plants, but 
never allow more than two or three heal- 
thy plants to remain in ea h hill. 

Connecticut I^arge Field.— 

Very prolific ; one of the best for stock. 
Qt. 15c. Pk. 75c. Bush. $2.uo. 

Sweet Potato.— One of the best pie 
and cooking pumpkins, of good size, 
slightly riboed, skin ot creamy w lite, dry 
and finegrained. Keeping well until late 
in the spring. J4 lb. 25c. Lb 60c. 

Cusliaw or Crookneck.— Pro- 
ductive; color light cream, s 'metimes 
lightly striped. . Pkt. 5c. X lb. 25c. Lb. 
70c. post|)aid. 



Q 

If) 




Houlton. — Grown seed stock. All the leading varieties at lowest market prices. 



PAESLEY. 



PUMPKIM. POTATOES. 



PEAS. 



PEAS ESPECIALLY FOR SEED PURPOSES. 

lirown in Canada, vvitli special care. IMeased do not compare thein wilii Western 
grown stock th^t can be bonglit at a lower price. 




FIRST AND BEST PFAS. 



PEAS. (Krbsen) 



Atld 15c. per quart extra if to be sent by 
mail. I (jt. for 100 ft. of drill, 2 bushels 
tu the acre. 

Culture, — For early crop sow in Feb- 
ruary or ]\Iarch, as soon as the ground can 
be worked, and in succession as desired. 

R-ich soil is the best. Make double rows, 
eight inches apart, then allow a clear space 
three feet or moie between these and the 
next rows. Drop peas along these rows 
five inches apart, and between the rows 
plant brush to which the vines will cling. 
/According to the growing tendencies of the 
different varieties, the brush or any other 
artificial support may be long or short. 

F^or market crop sow in single rows three 
inches deep, and two or three feet apart, 
according to variety. 

First and ISest. — It is very profita- 
ble for the gardener and shipper because 
it is very early, ripens uniformly, so that 
all the pods may be picked within seven 
weeks from the time of planting, and that 
at one picking. No brush or other support 
is required, as they seldom, under any cir- 
cumstances, grow to exceed 20 inches in 
height. Ft. loc. (Jt. 20c. Pk. .75c. Bu. 13.00. 



True Alaska. — The earliest blue 
pea. The dark green color of the pods 
makes it extremely desirable as it can be 
carried long distances without losing color, 
which quality, combined with its earliness 
and uniformity of ripening, makes it a most 
desirable pea for market gardeners. 
Height two feet. Pt. loc. Qt. 20c. Pk. 
$1.00. Bush. $4.00. 
EXTRA EARLY WRINKLED PEAS. 

Xott's Excelsior.— The very best 
short vine. Wrinkled extra early pea. 
Vines are more vigorous and taller than 
the American Wonder, and the pods are 
one-third larges, containing often 6 to 8 
large peas, closely compacted together, 
and for sweetness and quality it has no 
superior. Pt. loc. Qt. 20c. Pk. I1.25. 
Bush. $4.50. 

American Wonder.— This variety 
stands unrivaled in point of productiveness 
flavor and quality, and is without except- 
ion the earliest wrinkled pea in cultivation. 
It is of dwarf and robust habit, growing 
from ten to fifteen inches high, and pro- 
duces a profusion of good sized and well 
filled pods of the finest flavor. Dry peas, 
medium size, wrinkled and flattened, pale 
green. Requires liberal fertilizing. Pt. 
IOC. Qt. 20c. Pk. $1.25. Bush. |4 50- 



i6 



P. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 




PREMIUM GEM PEAS. 



Heroine. — Has many very desirable qualities 
which rank it the equal of our best Wrinkled Pea. 
A second early sort grows two and one-half feet 
high, has strong and vigorous vines, laden with an 
abundance of large, handsome pods filled with peas 
of most luscious quality. Pt. loc, Ot 20c. Pk. 
$r.oo. Bush. I4.00. 



WRINKLED VARIETIES. 

Preniium Geui. — This variety is nearly as 
earh" as the American Wonder, and the vine is de- 
cidedly larger, growing to a height of from twelve 

to fifteen inches, and bearing an immense crop of 
pods, which are larger and invariably well filled 
with peas of best quality. The dry peas are green, 
large wrinkled, often flattened. Pt. loc. Ot. 20c. 
Pk. |i.oo. Bush. 54-00- 

Teleplioiie. — A luscious wrinkled pea-pods 
large size, and peas large, excellent quality, an 
enormous cropper, grows four feet high. Pt. loc. 
Ot. 2oc. Pk. Si. GO. Bush. I3.75. 

York-Sliire Hero.— A splendid and popular 
wrinkled green marrow pea, verj^ prolific, exceed- 
ing luscious, and an abundant bearer ; grows about 
two and a-half feet high. Pt. loc. Ot. 25c. Pk. 
$r.oo. Bush. $4.00. 

riiampioii of £iig1aitcl. — Wrinkled— A 
green wrinkled variety, famous for its delicious 
flavor. Consider it one of the finest varieties for 
family use, and will follow any of the second early 
varieties in ripening. Pt. loc. Ot. 20c. Pk. 90c. 
Bush. I3.00. 




GENERAL CROP. 

Dwarf white .^la r r o w f a t.— 

Height three and a half to four feet. 
Peas large, standard varietv. Pt.. icc. 
Ot. 15c. Pk. 60c. Bush. ?2.6o. 



^ 



TELEPHONE. 



Black E3 e ^ffarrowfaf .— Pt. loc. 



Ot. i^c. Pk. 60c. Bush <2.oo. 



I 



PKAS. 



RAOiSJhl. 



17 




L.oi]g' Scarlet.— Short top, long 
deep scarlet roots, fine flavor. Pkt. 5c. 
Oz. IOC. % lb. 20c. Lb. 50C. 

New CliarUier.— The color at top 
is crimson, running into pink at middle, 
and thence downward to pure waxy 
white. It will attain a very large size 
before it becomes unfit for use. Pkt. 
5c. Oz. IOC. X lb. 20c. Lb. 60C. 

Early Scarlet Olive Sliaped. 

Pkt. 5c. Oz. IOC. X lb. 20C. Lb. 50C. 

liong BriglitcHt Scarlet.— 

This is am improvement of the old time 
long scarlet, being somewhat thicker 
and not quite so long ; color bright 
scarlet, white tip, is very early, mild 
flavored, fine for forcing or out-door 
planting. Pkt 5c. Oz. loc 
Lb. ^oc. 



% lb. 20c. 



RADISH. (Rettig). 

I oz. will sow 100 ft. of drill, 9 lbs. will 
sow an acre. 

Culture. — Select ]ij;ht sandy soil: 
spade deeply and manure well. For early 
crop, sow in hot beds in February or 
March. For main crop, sow at intervals 
from early spring until last of September 
in deep, rich soil. Broadcast sowing is 
allowable, but drilling is more professional 
however, radishes do well by either me- 
thod. Thin when they crowd, or the crop 
will be imperfect. They may be drawn 
after a few weeks growth. 



EARLY VARIETIES. 

Philadelpliia Wliite Box.— 

Has a very small top, color white, tur- 
nip shape, equally valuable for growing 
under glass or in opening ground. Pk. 
5c. Oz. IOC % lb. 2oc. Lb. 60C. 

Scarlet Olobe.— Very early for 
forcing; globe form and beautiful. Try 
it in your hot-beds. Pkt. 5c. Oz. loc. 
X lb. 2oc. Lb. 75c. 

Scarlet Tiiriiip, Wliite Tip. 

A very early and handsome variety. 
Pkt 5c. Oz. IOC. % lb. 20c. Lb. 6oc. 

Early Scarlet Turnip.— Tur- 
nip shape, scarlet skin, fine flavor. 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. IOC % lb. 20C. Lb. 50C. 
Early White Turnip.— Except- 
mg color, like the red. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 
IOC. % lb. 20c. Lb. 50c. 



Eoiii: Wliite Vienna or 
Eady Finger.— This in shape re- 
sembles the long scarlet; color snow 
white, it is of very rapid growth ; and 
remarkable crisp, brittle and tender. 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. IOC X lb. 20c. Lb. 60c. 

SUMMER VARIETIES. 

Earge White Summer. — The 

very best white radish for spring and 
summer use, beautiful in size and shape ; 
somewhat earlier than the Strasburg. 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. IOC X lb. 20c Lb. 60c. 

White Strasburg. —Large white 
radish, which stands summer heat; hand- 
some shape and pure white color. (See 
cut.) Pkt. 5c Oz. IOC X lb. 20c. Lb. 50c 

French Br eak fas t.— Quick 
growth, mild and tender, good for forcing. 
Pkt 5c. Oz. IOC ]4- lb. 20c «Lb. 60c. 




WHITE STRASBURG RADISH. 



i8 



P. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 




BLOOMSDALE SAVOY LEAVED SPINACH. 

SPINACH. iSpinat). 

lo to 15 lbs. to acre. 

Culture. — Select strong soil, spade 
deeply and manure. Sow broadcast or 
sprinkle seed freely in shallow drill one 
foot apart ; but plants should never stand 
closer than six inches. The seed lies two 
weeks before sprouting, and good seed 
often spoils in the ground when circum- 
stances do not favor germination. 

L.oug St a n d i 11 g.— The best for 
spring sowing, because it will stand longer 
before running to seed than any other 
varieties. Lb. 25c. 

Blooiusdale Savoy. — Well known 
and popular with market gardeners. The 
best and most profitable. Very curly 
(See cut). Lb. 25c. 10 lbs. or over 20c, 

TOBACCO. 

Culture. — Sow in hot-beds or in open 
ground, soon as can be worked in spring, 
w'hen plants are large enough transplant 
in rows three feet each way. 

Connecticut Seed teal'. — Pkt. 
5c. Oz. 25c. 




early white bush SQUASH. 

SQUASH OR CYMBLING. 

(Kurbis). 

Bush sorts, i oz. for 50 hills. Bush va- 
vieties. 5 to 6 lbs., and running varieties, 
3 to 4 lbs. in hills for an acre. 

Culture. — After the weather is settled 
and warm, plant in hills five to eight feet 
apart. Rich soil is best, but if necessary 



the hills alone may be enriched. Allot 
eight seeds to a hill, but do not allow 
more than three vigorous plants to remain 
at each hill. Keep soil loose and free of 
weeds. Water if drought prevails. 




BOSTON marrow SQUASH, 

Early Whitli Busli Scalloped 
or Patty Pan. — Tne best for early 
market use Preferred for table. (See 
cut. Pkt. 5c. Oz. IOC ^4 lb. 20c. Lb. 50c. 

Summer Crookneck. — Early, 
fine fiaror; a desirable table sort. Pkt. 
5c. Oz. IOC. U lb. 2oc. Lb. 60c. 

Winter Crookneck. —Flesh red, 
fine flavor ; largely grown lor winter use. 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. Tcc. % lb. 20C. Lb. 60C. 

Boston Marrow. — A splendid win- 
ter squash of good keeping qualities 
Flesh bright orange, fine grain and flavor 
unsurpassed. It is oval-shaped and thin 
skin of bright orange color. For pies it is 
equal to the best pumpkin. (See cut). 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. IOC. X it). 20c. Lb. 50c. 

Hubbard. — A desirable sort, suita- 
ble for winter use. Pkt 5c. Oz. loc. ^ 
lb. 20c. Lb. 60c. 

SALSIFY OR OYSTER PLANT. 

(Bocksbart). 

6 to S lbs. to acre. 

Culture — Sow early in spring, in drills 
fifteen inches a part ; cover with fine soil 
one and a half inches deep ; thin to six 
inches apart. As soil is strong and in- 
clines to depth and lightness, it propor- 
tionately is adapted to salsify. As the 
leaves resemble grass, be careful they are 
not mistaken in weeding. Salsify keeps 
over winter like parsnips. 

Sandwlcli Island ^lammotli.— 
A new and improved Salsify. Roots are 
very large and superior; grown extensi- 
vely for our large city markets ; much 
superior to other sons. (See cut). Pkt. 
5c. Oz. 15c ,!+■ lb. 40c. Lb. $1.35. 

targe Wliite. — A very good variety 
for general use ; handsome shape, large 
and smooth. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 15c. ^4.' lb. 
40c. Lb. $1.25. 







■■?mmM///M !fl>'i 



^f^mr^^'^^^^^^^^^ 










MAMMOTH SANDWICH ISLAND SALSIFY. 



SPINACH. TOBACCO. SQUASH. SALSIFY. TOMATOES. 19 




NEW STONE TOMATO. BEST FOR MAIN CROP. 



TOMATO. (.Liebesapfel). 



I oz. to 1500 plants. 4 to 6 oz. (to trans- 
plant), for an acre. 

Culture. — Seed may be started in hot- 
beds in March or sufficient plants for family 
use can be grown in pots or boxes in-doors, 
with very little trouble. 

Be particular to give plants the benefit of 
the fresh air and sun whenever judicious, for 
the purpose of hardening them : and cover 
with mats when necessary to prevent them 
from frosting. The two extremes ofheat or cold 
are equally injurious, It is customary with the 
best gardtners to remove the plants from the 
hot-beds to the cold frames, allowing a dis- 
tance of several inches between the plants. 
In May select and prepare the soil, and set the 
plants 3 ft. apart each way. Hoe and draw 
earth to the stem. When the plants crowd, 
the fruit will be small. Have the soil very 
rich. For general crop sow from middle of 
April or during May, in open air, selecting 
good soil, m a location much exposed to the 
sun and sheltered by a hill, fence or woods 
on the North. 

Xew Stone.— This tomato ripens for 
main crop, is very large and of bright scarlet 
color, very smooth, ripens evenly to the stem 
without a crack, exceedingly solid and firm 
fiesh, (as its name indicates). (See cut). 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. 20C. X lb. 50c. Lb. $1.60. 




DWARF CHAMPION TOMATO. 



20 



P. MANN 6fc CO.. WASHINGTON. D. C. 



TO IVi ATO E S . —Continued. 



liiyiiigstou's Beauty. — A de- 
cided favorite for home market or ship- 
ping purposes, being early, hardy, a 
strong grower, productive, large size, 

ahva\'S smooth, perfect in shape and ex- 
cellent in quality. The color is a very 
glossy crimson with a tinge of purple. 
It grows in clusters of four to six large 
fruits, retaining its large size late in the 
season. It ripens with Acme and Per- 
fection, and is entirely free from ribbed 
and elongated fruit. ' It is very firm 
fleshed, has a tough skin and but few 
seeds. It seldom rots or cracks after a 
rain like man}- of the tender skinned 
sorts. For shipping and early market 
it cannot be excelled, on account of so'- 
idty, toughness of skin, and especially 
its handsome color ; it can be picked 
quite green, and look well and ripen up 
nicely, will keep perfect for a week 
after it is ripe. Used largeh' by market- 
men and long distance shippers ev^erj^- 
where. Pkt 5c. Oz. 20c. % lb. 6qc. 
Lb. $2,00. 




Acme. — Earl}^, of medium size, per- 
fectly smooth, very solid and a great bearer 
crimson color with a pinkish cast. Pkt 5c. 

Oz. 20c. U lb. 40C. Lb. I1.35. 

Buckeye Stale.— ^"ery productive ; 

large smooth, purple. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 20c. 
yi lb. 60C. Lb. |2^oo. 

Trophy. — Very large, solid, and gen- 
erally smooth ; selected strain. Pkt. 5c. 
Oz. 20c. % lb. 60c. Lb. $2 00. 



Prizetaker. — A splendid markable 
tomato. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 15c. 
Lb. I1.25. 



% lb. 40c. 



Queen.— Large, perfect tomato. Pkt. 
5C. Oz. 2oc. U ^b. 40c. Lb. |i.6o. 

Dwarf Cliauipioii.— This new to- 
mato is dwarf and compact in growth, the 
plants growing stiff and upright, withthi^^k, 
jointed stems and foliage unlike any other 
tomato. It is very early, smooth, medium 
size, sound, handsome and abundant 
bearer. Pkt. 5C.-10C. Oz. 20c. % lb. 6oc. 
Lb. I2.00. 

Paragon.— Somewhat resembles the 
Queen, and an immence cropper. Pkt. 5c. 
Oz. 20C. % lb. 60C. Lb. I2.00. 

Favorite.— 1 his is a large, perfect 
shaped tomato. One of the best. Pkt. 5c. 
Oz, 20C. 14 lb. 50C. Lb. I1.50. 



Ponclorosa or Big 400.-Per. 

fectly hrm and solid, of deep red color, 
and most deliciour flavor. Pkt. 5c. Oz. 
25c. % lb. Ii.oo. Lb. I3. 50. 

Perfection Tomato.— Perfection 
Tomato an old reliable sort of much merit. 
Pkt. 5c. Oz. 20c. % lb. 60C. Lb. |:2.oo. 

Truckers Fa voriie.-The best oi 
all main crop, purple colored tomatoes. 
It originated in Burlington County, N*. J. 

It is one of the largest tomatoes grown, 
and is most regular in shape and size. 
Color purplish-red, very solid, firm flesh, a 
good keeper, and not "subject to rot or 
crack on the vines. It is an excellent ship- 
per, and sold in Philadelphia markets at 
better prices than any other variety ottered 
at the same time. Ripens evenly to the 
stem, is a strong, healthy grower, not sub- 
ject to rust or blight, is an enormous crop- 
per, and produces until the vines are killed 
by frost, holding its size exceedingly well 
until the last picking. The quality is of the 
ver\- best, and for cooking and slicing pur- 
poses it cannot be excelled. It is in every 
way a most desirable variety for market 
gardeners, and hence the name, " Truck- 
er's Favorite r Pkt. 5c. Oz. 35c. % lb. 
%i.oo. Lb. I3. 50. 



TOMATOBS. T^URNIPS. RUXA^BAGA. 



21 



TURNIPS. (Steckrube). 
1)4 ^o 2 lbs. to the acre. 

Culture. — Choose good sandy, pliant 
soil. Where the soil is poor, incorporate 
rotten manure. Choice determines be- 
tween sowing m drills and broadcast, but 
in respect to Ruta baga, experience in- 
clines to drills. Drills should he i8 inches 
apart, and the plants 8 or jo inches dis- 
tant in the rows. Thinning is equally ne- 
cessary when sown broadcast. Good cul- 
tivation will impfbve the crop. During 
November remove the crop in anticipation 
of frost, trim the leaves within one or two 
inches of the bulb, then store the turnips 
away in the cellar, covering freely with 
straw, and sheltering all with a covering 
of dry earth. The "^ame precaution will 
protect them ou'-doors. Pile the turnips 
in hills, small at the top, sloping gradu- 
ally, and observe the same form with the 
covering to prevent the lodgement of 
moisture. 




Purple Top White Globe.- A 

standard white variety, with purple top, 
handsome, globe shaped, and heavy crop- 
per ; leading turnip among truckers and 
gardeners. Oz 5c. Lb. 40c. 

Amber drlobe. — A good variety for 
general crop. Flesh, solid and sweet ; 
keeps well late in spring, grows large ; 
fine for table or stock. Oz. 5c. Lb. 40c. 

Yellow Aberdeen.— Hardy, good 
keeping turnip ; yellow flesh and very pro- 
ductive. Oz. 5c. Lb. 40c. 



N O T I C K. 

The greatest care is taken to supply 
every article true to name, and of the very 
best quality ; at the same time it is under- 
stood that we do not warrant our seeds 
and that we are not in any respect respon- 
sible for any loss or damage arising from 
any failure thereof. 




RED TOP STRAP LEAVED TURNIP. 

Purple Top White Flat.— A 

rapid growing white, flat, strap leaf tur- 
nip, with purple top ; mild flavor, and very 
popular for early use and general crop. 
Oz. 5c. Lb. 40C. 



RUTA BAGA. 




Improved American Purple- 
Top Ituta-Baga.— Very hardy and 
productive ; flesh, yellow, solid and sweet 
good for table use or stock. (See cut). 
Oz. 5c. Lb. 40C. 

For culture, see turnip. 



Observe, that on account of short 
crops in some varieties of seeds, prices 
are subject to change without notice. 



22 P. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 

HERBS. (Gevvortze). 

Culture.— -Select light, rich soil and lay off in shallow drills i foot apart, along 
which sprinkle the seed and cover slightly. Do not let the plants stand closer than 
two or three inches. 

Pkt. Oz. 

Marjoram 5c. 35c. 

Sweet Basil. .5c. 15c. 

Sage 5c. 15c. 

Thyme. ........ = 5c. 15c. 

Lavender. 5c. 25c. 

Savoy *. 5c. 15c. 

Dill 5c. 15c. 

A KULL ASSOSXIVIEXT OK 

G o o o o FLOWER SEEDS o © o o o 

Put up nicely in Illustrated Papers, explaining Culture, etc., etc. 

Packet 5 Cents. 

SUMMER FLOWERING BULBS. 

CALADIUM OR ELEPHANT EARS. 

GLADIOLI AND TUBEROSE BULBS. 

DAHLIA, CAXNA AND MADERIA VINE ROOTS. 

^V^<^ -^ - SWEET PEAS. 

tfiD-^\€j/V^'\y'^f The demand for sweet peas has increased 

^^^^-^Vi^ *"^*^TO/^ more and more each season, that the past tew 

'^'^S/^^^k^ y^^^s have placed them in the first ranks among 

If IV^*'^-^^^^^^^^ flowering Plants. 

'^9,V-aJ,^^^^I^Aw4^ Extra Fine Mixed. This is a splendid 

mixture, which includes nearly all of the best 
varieties. Pkt. 5c. }4 lb. 15c. Lb. 40c. 

£iiiily Henderson.— Pure white, very 
productive, one of the earliest, popular with 

florists for forcing. Pkt. 5c. % lb. 20c. Lb. 50c 

SWEET PEA HEDGE. 

WE PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO OUR SEED DEPART.MENT. 




HERBS. FLOWER SEEDS. SWEET PEA. (iRASS SEED. MOWER. 23 



CAPITOL CITY LAWN GRASS SEED. 

Our mixture of Grass 
Seeds for Lawns, ParksTen- 
nis and Cricket Grounds is 
composed of tiie finest va- 
rieties of grasses, each of 
wliich has its season of 
beauty, and the lesult of 
this blending, is the pro- 
ducing of a sod that is not 
only always evergreen and 
velvety in appearance but 
of the color and beauty of 
the emerald. 

Seeding is preferable 
to sodding, because it is 
cheaper, and will soon cov- 
er the earth with a luxuri- 
ant growth of thrifty grass 
and if fertilized spring and 
fall will last indefinitely. 

Frequent mowing pre- 
vents natural seeding, 
which grasses annually 
supply in abundance to re- 
store and thicken sod. 
Hence, when ihe grass is 
injured by tramping, or 
thinned by any other cause, the best and most natural method to restore its beauty is 
to sow seed plentifully Use two pounds of seed on a space 20x40, or 800 square feet. 

To prepare the groun^i for seeding Lawn Grass, it should be plowed deeply, cross 
plowed, and the soil finely pulverized and enriched. Use fertilizer and avoid the dan- 
ger of an importation of seeds, the growth of sorrel, weeds, etc., liable to be in barn- 
yard manure. 

The seed should be covered very slightly and a roller run over the ground after 
sowing. Pt. IOC. Qt. 20c. Lb. 25c. Pk. 75c. Bus. $2 50. 




GIRARD LAWN MOWER. 




10 inch $325 

12 " 3.7s 

14 " 4.00 

36 " High Wheel 4.50 

18 " " '* 5.00 



24 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



PLANTS 

IN SEASON. 

Cabbage, 
Celery, 

Egg Plant, 

Tomato, 
Pepper, 

Lettuce and 

Cauliflower, 

At LKO^s?v^est F*rices. 



INSECT DESTROYERS. 




The great merit of this Insectcide lies in 
its non-poisonous properties. No danger 
need be apprehended by the person apply- 
ing it, nor will it injure animals, should 
they eat it — unless in large quantities. It 
does not render injurious the vegetables 
or fruits to which it is applied, and yet it is 
probably the best Insect Destroyer that 
has ever been offered. It is particularly 
useful for the prevention and destruction 
of Potato Bugs and all Worms and Insects 
that infest our gardens. It comes already 
to be applied — there is no mixing with 
plaster or flour, no dissolving in water — it 
is simply dusted on lightly so that it 
reaches all parts of the plants. 5 pound 
package for 25c. 10 pound package for 
45c. Special prices on larger quantities in 
bulk. 

PARIS GREEN 

In any (juantity at lowest prices. 



THE 
DOUBLE TUBE 

No. 9 Lightning Insect Exterminator. 

Price, 75 Cents. 



THE 
DOUBLE TUBE 

Ko. 20 Lightning Insect Exterminator. 

Adapted for every kind of insect killing 
and spraying purposes. Two quarts of 
water and a teaspoonful of Pat is Green 
will kill two thousand hills of potato bugs. 

Made with detachable Glass Reservoir. 

Liquids can be seen from the outside. 

Write for catalogue. 

Price, $1.25. 




Plants. Insect Destroyers. Exteiininatois. Pnnip. Buckwheat, (iiass Sesds. 



THE MYERS IMPERIAL 
BRASS SPRAY PUMP. 




This spray pump is constructed entirely 
of brass, a material that is not affected 
by the poisonous arsenities used in differ- 
ent formulas for spraying fruit trees, vines 
and shrubbery. It is so arranged that 
the labor of pumping is all done on the 
downward stroke of the piston and nothing 
on the up. The effect of this operation 
while pumping is to hold the pump down. 
Jhe foot rest steadies the pump, holding 
it in proper position. 

It is provided with a large air chamber, 
and has ball valves ; the pressure is held 
uniformly in the air chamber and on 
the hose, so that the nozzle throws a con- 
tinuous spray, and is not affected by the 
movement of the plunger. The opera- 
tor is enabled to keep a constant pres- 
sure on the nozzle of from 50 to 100 pounds 
with very ordinary exertion. Will throw 
a solid stream 50 feet, and is of unusual 
value for washinij- windows, buggies, and 
extinguishing fires, sprinkling lawns, 
flowers, etc. For spraying is arranged so 
as to discharge a fine jet in the bottom of 
bucket, to keep the solution thoroughly 
mixed and agitated, a feature peculiar to 
this pump only, and a very necessary fea- 
ture to a spray pump. 

Price, $3-50- 



GRASS SEEDS. 

Red Clover, 

White Clover, 

Crimson (Hover, 
Timothy, 

Red Top, 

Orchard Grass, 
Blue Grass, 

Hungarian Grass and 

German Millet 
Seed Wheat, 

Rye and Oats 
At Lowest Market Prices. 



IATAW^3H,S 




Japanese Buckwheat.— This is a 

new and distinct variety of great value, 
not olny for its enormous productiveness, 
but for the fine quality of the meal. The 
straw is heavier, and it does not require 
to be sown as thickly as other varieiies. 
Lowest Market Prices. 



26 p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



FERTILIZERS. 



We Manufacture our wellknown Brands of Fertilizers which 
we are pleased to offer the Farmers and Gardners for 1900. 



PURE RAW BONE. 

ANALYSIS. 

Bone Phos. of Lime 47 per cent. 

Ammonia 4 " 

Put up in 200 pound bags, 10 bags to the ton. 



POTOMAC AMMONIATED SUPER=PHOSPHATE. 

For Potatoes, Cabbage and General 
Oarden Truck. 

ANALYSIS. 

Ammonia 4 per cent. 

Potash, K. O 15^ 

Nitrogen. 3 " 

Put up in 167 pound bags, 12 bage to the ton. 



SPECIAL TOBACCO AND CORN FERTILIZER. 

Made of High Grade Goods and which are wellknown to the Farmers and 
Gardners of Maryland and Virginia. 

GIVE THEM A TRIAL, 



CAN KURNISH MIGH GRADK 

Nitra of Soda, Muriate of Potash, Ground Fish and Tankage, 
Dissolved South Carolina Rock and Land Plaster. 



PRICES WILL BE GINEN ON APPLICATION. 



fh:rtii^I2^krs. 



PLvOV/S. 



27 




No. io>4 SIZE, R. H. Price, $9. 00. 

Imperial Plows are made in all sizes, steel, chilled or combination, from a small 
pony, to a large two or three horse plow, either right or left-hand. Wood or steel 
beam, wiih or without wheel and jointer, knee cutter, fin cutter, rolling cutter; im- 
proved to date. Imperial Hillside Plows in wood or steel beam ; all sizes. Wood and 
cast beam road plows, Vineyard plows, Grub or New Ground plows, Sulky plows and 
Gang plows. 

For two horses. Chilled. Weight loo pounds. 




No. 8 SIZE, Price. $550. 

Weight 65 pounds. For one-horse. 



28 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINOTON, vD^ C. 



STEEL KING STEEL PLOWS. 




Number. 

" Poiiy " 

"A" 

"B" 



■( 



Same 


size 


as 




Oliver Pattern 


{No. 


A) 


■ ( " 


B) 


( " 


lo) 


( " 


13) 


( " 


.19) 



) 



Plow. 

$3 00 
3 50 
4.00 
5 50 
6.50 



Plows include wrench and one hardened steel share extra. 



The base of these plows is made entirely of steel, with hardened steel share. Land- 
side has suction device for regulating in hard ground. The success attending the in- 
troduction and sale of these plows the past seasons, enables us to offer them again with 
confidence. They are well made, nicely finished, and do first-class work. We have 
largely reduced prices of both plows and repairs, and this will add greatly in making 
the " Steel Kmg " tlie popular plows. 



Oliver Chilled Plows. 



Farmers' Friend Plows, 

Minor & Horton Plow^s. 

Can furnish repairs tor the Imperial, 



and all other Leadincr Plows. 

C5 



"Buffalo Pitts" Spring 

WITH SPRING ACTION 

List Price with WhifHetrees and Yoke. 
No. O, Six i6-in discs, 

3 ft. cut $22.50 

Mo. 1, Eigiit i6-in. discs, 

4 ft. cut 24.00 

Mo. 3, Ten i6-in. discs, 

Sft.cut 25 50 

?4o JJ, Twelve i6-in. 

discs, 6 ft. cut 27.00 

^Jo. 7, Twelve 20-in. t \ 

discs, 6 ft. cut 33.00 \ \ 

Larger sizes to order, ^'^ ^■ 

Subject to Discount. 



h:_^e,i^O"V7"S- 



29 



Flexible Disc Harrow. 

ON THE DISC GANGS. 




The only Disc Harrovy piade having a spring pressure device, which alone places it 
far in advance of any competitor. The greatest objection to all other disc harrows, is 
the "humping up" in the centre, causing the outer discs to run deeper than the centre 
ones with consequent uneven depth of work. This is all overcome on.the Pitts by a pair 
of liexible steel springs running from the pole to the main axle, controlled by foot of 
driver. 

Improved Imperial Spring Tooth Harrow 

All Steel and Malleable Iron ; teeth of finest spring steel, frame elevated 
on runners or wheels ; prevents accumulation of trash ; fitted with plain or 
self-sharpening teeth or reversible, renewable point teeth. 




2 sections, 15 th..$i6.50 
2 sections, 17 th.. 18.50 



30 



P. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D, C. 



REPRESENTS TWO-SECTION IMPERIAL 
SPIKE TOOTH HARROW. 




2-section, 50 teeth. 
2-section, 60 teeth 
3-stction, 75 teeth, 



$11.50 

. 17-50 



The Kain Two=Section Harrow. 




The above cut represents the Kain Two-Section Harrow. 

We make two sizes of this harrow. The larger size has 50 teeth and cuts eight 
feet and six inches wide. The smaller size contains 40 .teeth and cuts six feet and six 
inches wide. 

Our two-section harrows are guananteed better made, better fini'^hed, and have 
more superior points of excellence than ordhiary Scotch harrows to which they should 
not be confounded. 

We also make a Gardener's Harrow of 24 and 30 teeth. 

2-section, 40 teeih $10.00 

3-section, 50 teeth 14.00 

GARDEN HARROWS. 

i-section, 30 teeth $7-50 

i-section, 24 teeth 6.50 



HARROWS. 



GRASS SKEDBRS. 



Star Force=Feed Grass Seeders, 




THE LATEST AND BEST WHEELBARROW SEEDER ON THE MARKET. 

It not only forces the seed out when in operation but prevents the seed from escap 
ing of its own weight when not in use. The device for charging quantity is exeeed 
ingly simple, sowing from 2>^ to 46 pounds of clovor seed to acre or any intermediate 
quantity. Seeders that change quantit> by a bolt in a series of holes cannot sow the 
intermediate quantities represented by the space between the holes. 

It is with renewed confidence that we offer the •' Star" Seeder having enjoyed 
a large trade in the last several years and received unqualified endorsements. 

14 foot box, takes in two drill rows : $6.50 

16 " for orchards 7.00 



The Little Giant Seeder. 



Greatest 



Labor SaTing 
of the Age. 



IiiTeiitioii 



STRONOE?»T! 

PRETTIEST! 

I.IGHTEST ! 
SIMPLE IN CO]^STRUCTIOI^! 

EASIEST RII]¥]¥IXG ! 

Has a Pressed Tin Distributing Wheel, which 
is found in no other seed sower. No feed plate 
to carry. The agitator, or force feed is found 
in no other seed sower. 

Price ^2.00 




Cahoon's Patent Broadcast Seeder. 

KOR SOWING 

^VIleat, 

Barle;y, Oats, 

Btji cli^sTS^ tieat 

Rye, Hemp, Rice, 

Grass Seeds, &c. 

Price $3.50 



32 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Planet Jr. Garden TTools. 



We handle the full " Planet Jr." line and shall be glad to send "upon 
special Planet Jr. Catalogue with full descripuon and illustrations. The m 
implements follow. 

•* PLANET JR." No. 11 

Double Wheel Hoe, 



req 

ost 



uest the 
popular 



Does the work of six to 
ten men with ordinary hand 
hoes. It ma}' be used to strad- 
dle the row, or between rows 
as desired. The rakes culti- 
vate, cover seed, etd. The 
Hoes kill everything they 
meet, leaving the ground le vel 
The Cultivator teeth are use- 
ful for marking out. The 
Plows lay out deep furrows 
and cover them, hill up or 
plow away, as desired. No 
vegetable grt^wer can afford 
to be without this tool. 



Cultivator, Rake 
and Plow. 




Price complete $7-25 

" plain, with only one pair of hoes 4-75 



THE PI.AXET JR. COMBIXED WHEEE, HOE, 

CEETIVATOR, RAKE AXD PEOW. 

This drill is perfectly adjustable 
and in all respects works to perfec- 
tion. The Rakes are invaluable in 
preparing the ground for planting, 
covering seed, first cultivation, etc. 
The Hoes work closely all rows 
up to sixteen inches wide at one 
passage. The Plow opens furrows, 
covers them, hills, plows to or from, 
etc. The Cultivator teeth are 

adapted to deep mellowing of the 
soil and marking out. 

Price complete $io.oo 

" Drill only 7.75 




FIRE-FEY WHEEE GARDEX PEOW. 

Will throw a furrow four to six inches wide and 
one to three inches deep, and by going ticice in the 
same furrow when breaking up ground, it will do 
admirable work, many times as fast as could possible 
be done with the spade. 

Price , $2.50 




GARDEN TOOLS, 

Steel Frame Cultivator 

In all respects the best Five T*oih 
Cultivator built. Steel expanding- 
frame, reversible steel teeth, with or 
without lever, as desired. 

I^ii'e $3.00 

Add for lever expander 50 

Add for vvhtel , 75 



CULTIVATORS. 



33 




I 



14 Tooth Steel Harrow. 

The teeth can be set at several 
angles, and are reversible "top for 
bottom." 

This tool can be used in garden as 
either harrow or cultivator, it thor- 
oughly pulverizes, but throws no earth 
on plants. 

Price" '. ^400 

Add for lever expander 50 

Add for wheel ^ e 





Set of Horsehoe Attachments. 




May be used to advantage in 
hoeing from or covering the crop. 
Attachable to either of above 
tools. 

Pric e pf r set $1.50 




34 



P. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C 



Malta Double Shovel Plows. 



Blade has two holes. Clevis 
is adjustable. Frame all steel. 

The beams on this plow are 
made of steel, i}4^H inches. 
This gives the plow a light draft 
and the beams are stronger than 
those made of i>^x^ inch iron. 
Size of shovel, 6x11x7-16 inch. 

Price, Double Shovels.. .= . .$2 50 

'' Single " 2.25 

" Triple '• 3-50 





Single, Double and Triple Trees at Lowest Prices, 



CULTIVATOR STEELS AND EXTRAS. 




Fenders for double shovel plows 50c. 






Fan-tail covers. 



Bull-tono-nes. 



Shovels. 



FLOWS. C1LTI\ ATOR XTEKI;S. TOOl (;RINI)KR. OLIPI'KR. 35 

Automatic Star Sickle and Tool Grinder 



' s 




Weight 25 pounds. Price, $5.00 

Dr. H W. Leavitl's Latest Improvement in Dehorning Clippers is the "V" shape 
blade, the advantages of which are self-evident, as a glance at the cut will show. 

Dr. Iieaviti"s V shape blade Deliorniiig Clipper Cuts all 
aroiincl tlie Horn as ilie liaiidles are Being Closed. 




Knives cannot inter-lock, or cut into each other. It is our latest improvement, and 
is guaranteed to be superior to any other dehoner made. This style dehoner is made 
in the large size (No. 3) only, hut will clip the horns, clean and smooth, from cattle of 
any age. Any style of our machines have the same power and guarantee. 

By its construction, as shown in the above cut, you will see that it has a set of cogs 
in frame as well as in the cogged plunger, which enables the knife to be moved twice 
as far by the same movement of the handles, or the instrument is manipulated by a 
movement of the handles one-half the distance of our old patent. 

Price $7-50 



36 



p. MANN & CO. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Hocking Valley" Hand or "Welgtit" Dump Rake. 




Price, with combined Pole and Shafts $18.00 

This rake has 1% steel axle extending from wheel to wheel, givmg great strength 
and preventing any sagging. . , , ,, , • , . 

We call it a " Hand-dump Rake " but it is really a " weight-dump, as the weight 
of driver practically does the dumping after a slight upward tilt on the handle, unlocks 
the rake. The powerful lock leTCr is used, an ingenious joint which holds the teeth 
firmly to their work without use of hands or feet of operator, and preventing the annoy- 
ance of dum-Ding when full, before reaching line of windrow. Over the teeth are placed 
steel coil springs giving great elasticity, and breakage is practically unknown. Built 
of best material, finished in first-class style, and guaranteed throughout. 



BUFFALO PITTS ALL=STEEL SELF DUMP RAKE. 




Price ?22.00 

This rake is built entirely of steel and has a patent relieving spring which prevents 
iar in dumping. It has a combination hand and foot lever, a spring cleaner or guard- 
tooth between wheel and teeth to prevent hay from twisting into the wheel, and is up to 
date in all particulars. Strongly built and nicely finished. ^^^ . „ ^ ir^.Ue 

Extra Teeth to fit all Rakes: Tiger. Thomas, Ohio, Taylor, Wood, 30c. Extra I< orks 
to fit all Tedders, Bullard, Thomas, Chieftian, Sterling, Tiger, 45c. 



HAY RAKES. 



FODDER AND ENSILAGE CUTTERS. 



37 



nrFTB BBULE CITY 

FODDER AND ENSILAGE CUTTERS. 




The Belle City Fodder and £liiNilage Cutter is acknowledged to 
be the King of Cutters, because its points of merit over all others are many. 
The first and a very important fact is, that this machine requires one-third less power 
than any other, doing one-third more work in same time. Second is the Safety Attach- 
ment, making all danger to the operator impossible. The Safety Attachment is a lever 
by which the operator can stop the feed rolls as quick as he can put his hand on same, 
also reverse the feed by this lever and set the feed rolls revolving backwards, clean- 
ing the mouth of the cutter, should it become clogged without using his hands in the 
operation. 

All these changes — stopphig feed rolls, reversing feed rolls, and changing length 
of cut, done without stopping the cutter or the power running it. We can all see how 
this lever attachment could be the means of saving a man's life or limb, as he has this 
cutter always under perfect control. 

Our irons are all well finished : boxes for the shafting are babbitted, and when this 
machine is put together, it will run as smoothly as a lathe or other machinery, 

Our machines are finished better than any other cutters in the world, and are 
strong, durable and of great capacity, running with less power than any other, and can 
be run at great speed with perfect safety. 

We will send our cutters to any responsible party, subject to their approval, or on 
trial with other cutters, providing the customer buys the machine during the best work. 

Prices on application. • 



\8 



P. MANN & CO., WASHLNGTON, D. C. 



Beekman's Garden or Farm Barrow 




Painted green with scroll on side boards. 

The Nos. 4, 5 and 6 with our new eight spoke iron hub wheels on steel axles as 
illustrated. ' 

Nos. I, 2 and 3 with our new six spoke iron hub wheels, on steel axle. 

No. 1, Bo^-s' small $^40 

" 2, Medium 3.50 

" 3, I.arge 3.80 

" 4, Medium -37c 

**9 4.25 

" 6, Large 4.75 

Will be furnished with six spoke wood wheels when so ordered. 



CLIIVIAX BOLTED CANAL BARROWS. 




One of the strongest barrows made. Full size tray. Put together entirely with 
Bolts. 

Price with 16-inch wood wheel $2.00 

" " 16-inch iron wheel 2.25 

PORTSnOUTH STEEL ROAD SCRAPERS. 

The bowls are pressed from a solid 
steel plate. Furnished with runners, 
which prevent slipping on sloping 
ground and lessens wear on bottom. 

No. 3, weight 85 lbs $6.50 

" 3. " 95 " 6.75 

"1- " 105 " 7.00 




f Wlieelbai'i'ows. Scrapers. Weaner. Bells. Wagon Springs. Mole Trap. 39 



Rice's Calf Weaner and 



Sucking Cow Muzzle. 



For prevent! 11 j; calves and cows sucking themselves or 
each other. 

Habits most injurious to the animal and costly to the 
owner. It is no hindrance to either eating or drinking, does 
the animal no injury, has been thoroughly tested, is used 
and endorsed by the best stock raisers in the United States 
and Eui^land, approved of by the Royal Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, and acknowledged by all 
to be the best thing ever made for the purpose. 

MADE IN THREE SIZES. 

Price, No. 1, For Calves till one year old, 30 cents by mail, postpaid, 35 cents. 
" ■* 2, From one to two years old, 50 cents by mail, postpaid, 56 cents. 
'* " 3, For full grown animals and self-suckers, 75 cts. by mail, postpaid, 85 cts. 




FARH BELl.S. 




Price. 



No. 1, 40 pounds. $2,00 

" 2, 50 " 2.50 

" a, 75 " 3.50 

•' 4, 100 •' 4.50 




Wherry 

Self=Setting 
Hole Trap. 

No Mole can pass under 
this trap and live. 



$1.25 



'..\,-&^\l, (1 1//*/- ^ 
— 2^g^ ■"" 



NORTH'S SPRINGS. 

PRICE PER PAIR. 

1,000 lbs. cap'y, per set 




1,500 




2,000 




2,500 




3,000 




4,000 





r set..$ 


4.00 




6.00 




7.00 




7.50 




8.00 




10.00 



With these Springs on the Wagon there is neither jolting nor bruising of produce. 
Easily adjusted to any ordinary farm wagon without alteration to the wagon box. 



40 



P. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



CREAMERY SUPPLIES. 

Davis Swing Churn. 



No. 

1. . 

2. . 

4.. 

5-- 
6.. 



Capacity 

. 8 g^allons. 
.10 " 
.16 " 
.20 " 
.26 " 

•34 " . 
.60 " 



Will 
(.hurn 



4 gallons. 

• 5 

, 8 

10 



17 
•30 



Price 
$ 7.00 

8.00 
10.00 
12.00 
15.00 
18 00 
25.00 



Has no flo its nor paddles inside. 
There is no danger of 'he cover 
coming; off and spilling the cream. 
It requires less effort to work than 
any other. It is easily cleaned. 




IMPROVED CEDAR CYLINDER CHURN. 

The cut represents onr White 
Cedar C^'lmder Churn. We now 
use a doubled dasher, and the crank 
is locked io the churn wiih a clamp 
and thum S' rew, wicH, prevents 
leakage— lock cannot break. The 
top is large, and dasher easily re- 
moved. The best churn in u^e. 

Price, No. r, 3 gallons, ea'4i.$i.75 

■' 2. 4 " " . 2.25 

'• " 3. 7 " '• ■ 2.50 

" 4. 10 " " . 3.00 




lJout>le UcAslier. 



Tlaiiiia iicrev^^ Lock 



BUTTER PRINTS AND WORKERS. 



Old Reliable Wringer. 

!lii>il ir ra )Mc) . 

10 inch. . . .$2.50 

11 inch 2.75 

1 2 inch 3-25 



Peerless Wringer, 

(St e cut). 

loinch $2.50 

iiinrh 3-00 

12 inch 350 



ALL KINDS" OF 
WRINGERS REPAIRED 




Creamery Supplies. Wringers. Fence. Barb Wire. Stretcher. 41 
American Woven Wire Fence. — All Steel. 



98 INCH 




Amply provides for expansion and contrac 
tion. Only Best Bessemer steel wires 
used. Always of uniform quality 
Ne.ver goes wrong no matter how 

great a strain 

is put upon it. 
Does not muti- 
late, but does 
efficiently turn 
cattle, borses, 
liosfs and tisrs 

Made of large, strong steel wire. A perfect fence. 
Also "Antericaii " Steel Walk and Drive Gates. 







Main strands Nos. 12 or 121^ gauge, steel wire. Regular or Cattle Wire has barbs 
about 5 inches apart. Thickest or Hog Wire has barbs about 3 inches apart. 

Cable or Twist Wire- 
Made of two strands of Nos. 12 
'or i2>^ gauge steel wire. 

Ribbon and Plain Fence Wire, Galvanized Poultry Netting, all widths. Prices on 
above will be furnished on application. ^ 




Townsend Wire 
Stretcier. 



With this implement the 
person stretching the wire 
can nail it to the post from 
which he is stretching with- 
out assistance. 

The only true principle 
for a Wire Stretcher. 

It will give you better sat- 
isfaction than any stretchur 
you can find. Do not fail to 
get it. 

Price 75 cents. 



l<iltle Oiant, 75 ceulsi. 
Hercules, - - 35 " 



42 



p. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Mann's Green Bone Cutters. 




Are a necessity in successful poultry, raising. 
Eggs; are doubled and hens invigorated by its use. 

No. C, (with crank handle) ....$ 7.50 

No. 1 B., (with balance wheel) 10.00 

No. 1 B. M., (with balance wheel, 

mounted on iron stand) 13.00 

No. 4 B., (with balance wheel).. . . 15.00 
No. 4 B. M., (with balance wheel, 

mounted on iron stand) 18.75 

No. O, (Post bone cutter) 20.00 

No. 2^ (Standard bone cutter) 23.00 

No. 8, (Double hand cutter). . 28.00 

No. 10, (Small power cutten. . . 32.50 

No. 14, (Large power cutter)... 96.00 

No. 16, (Made to order) 280.00 

Clover Cutter, B., (with balance 

wheel) 10.00 

Clover Cutter, B. M., (with balance 

wheel, mounted on iron stand) 12.50 

Mortar, (perforated, corrugated, 

cast iron) 3.75 

20 per cent, discount from the above list. 




BRIBLEY'S SUPERIOR MEAT-HIEAIi. 

As now prepared is unrivaled. It is not only 
rich in Protein, which furnishes an abundance 
of Albumen, but in Nitrogen, Bone Phosphate 
Fat ; the proportions being so arranged as to 
best develope the body and maintain the health 
of the birds. 

Its use insures a structually perfect egg, and 
this means more chickens and better chickens 
from your eggs — a special point for those who 
hatch winter chickens to keep in mind. 

A considerable amount of liver is now used 
in its construction, thus preventing any tendency 
to scour, which is so common a fault with all 

other animal meal. It is not weighted with grit or oyster shell, like some imitatians 
sold at prices which may seem cheap, but in fact are dear. 

Put up in Wliite Bags printed in Red. See that the trade mark is on 
every package, and take no other. 

RETAIL PRICES. 

loo-lb. bags, 12.25. 50-lb. bags, $1.25. 25-lb. bags, (trial size), 75 cents. 
Beef Scrap. Ground Oyster Shell. Crush ed Bone. Mica Grit. 

THE I.Y01VS 

Improved Fanning nill. 

In calling your attention to our 
Fanning Mill we do so with a full sense 
of the high standard demanded of a 
machine by farmers and grain dealers, 
one that will do first-class work under 
all circumstances and on all occasions. 
The l^yons Improved Mill is, we think, 
the only Fanning Mill that is warranted 
in all respects as represented. They 
will clean from 60 to 100 bushels per 
hour in a perfect and satisfactory man- 
ner and they givf; universal satisfaction 
Price $20.00 




BONE CUTTEK. MEAT-MEAI;. KANNIiNMi MIM.. I'UMl'. 43 



BUCKEYE WOOD PUMPS. 



IM 



HOSE 
ATTACHMENT 



^-IIIMf^iiil 










All kinds and sizes of Pumps for both siiallovv and deep 
wells furnished —completely fitted for wells, satisfaction guar- 
anteed, Por. elain lined Pumps are recommended as the best 
and most saiisfactory in all cases. 



flyers' Double Acting Force Pumps. 

Well force pumps have patent glass valve seat. Patent 
drop valve. Brass or brass lined cylinders. 

Prices of Iron and VVooti Pumps "furnished on application. 



44 



P. MANN & CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE OWENSBORO FARM WAGON. 



TMIP,fl8L£ SKEIN 




We make this style in all the ditferent sizes. We use our own Improved Skein, 
which past usage has proven to be the best in use. They are larger at sleeve and allow 
full % inch more shoulder than most skeins now in use. Can furnish round or square 
hounds on front gears, with falling tongue coach hounds, with stiff, half stiff, or falling 
tongue, as may be desired. We use on all regular tire wagons cart rivits and burrs, 
unless otherwise ordered. 

Railroad or Contractor's Cart 




These carts are very strong, heavily ironed and made entirely of hard wood, and 
are especially designed for use of railroad contractors and miners. We furnish these 
carts with either the solid iron axle or the celebrated National Self-oiling Steel Tubu- 
lar Axles. 

SizK AND Description. — Height of wheels, 4 ft. lo in. Tire, 3x>^ in. 2>|xii in. 
Tubluar axle, or iron axle 2x11 in. Length of body, 5 ft. 10 in. Width of body, 3 ft. in 
front and 3 ft. 2 in. behind. Sides 12 in. deep, with 6 in. top sides. 

FARM CART. 

SizK AND Description. — Height of wheels, 4 ft. 10 in. Tubular axle 2>^x8>^, or 
ir m axle, 1^x9. Tire. 3x^. Length of body, 5 ft. 10 in. Width of body, 2 ft. 11 in. 
front and 3 ft. i in. behind. 12 in. deep. With 4-in. top side ^ 

We carry in stock a full line of Wa^oii. Biig'^y aiicl Carriage Harness, 
C'lBi-ry Combs, Brushes, aii«l f^table Supplies. 



FAR31 \>AO()NS. FARM (ARTS. P0STA(;F ON SEEDS. 



45 



POSTAGE ON SEEDS. 



Seed in packets, ounces and cjuarter pounds, are mailed by us fi^e of postage. 

Half pounds, pounds, pints and quarts, the postage must be added to the price 
quoted ; at the rate of eight cents per pound and fifteen cents per quart. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention and have every advantage, as to price 
and quality of goods, just the same as if the purchasershould call personally at our store. 

While we exercise care to have all Seeds pure and reliable, we do not give any 
warranty, expressed or implied, and will not be responsible in any respect, for any loss 
or damage arising from the failure thereof. If the purchaser does not accept the seeds 
on these terms or conditions they must be returned at once. 

Prices subject to change without :Xotice. 



Estimated Quantities of Seed Required for tlie Spate (jiiven. 



Asparagus. — i oz. produces looo plants, 
and requires a bed 12 feet square. 

Asparagus Roots. — rooo plants to a bed 4 
feet wide and 225 feet long. 

English Dwarf Beans. — i quart plants from 
100 to 150 feet of row. 

French Dwarf Beans. — i quart plants 250 
to 350 feet of row. 

Beans, pole, large. — i quart plants 100 
hills. 

Beans, pole, small. — i quart plants 39 
hills or 250 feet of row. 

Beets. — 10 lbs. to the acre ; i oz. plants 
150 feet of row. 

Brocoli and kale. — i oz. plants 2500 plants 
and requires 40 square feet of ground. 

Cabbage. — Early sorts same as brocoli, 
and requires 60 square feet of ground. 

Cauliflower. — The same as cabbage. 

Carrots. — i oz. to 150 feet of row. 

Celery. — i oz. gives 7000 plants, and re- 
quires 8 square feet of gronnd. 
Cucumbers. — i oz. to 150 hills. 
Cress. — I oz. sows a bed 16 feet square. 
Egg Plant.— I oz. to 2000 plants. 



Endive. — i oz. gives 2000 plants, and re- 
quires 80 feet of ground. 

Leek. — i oz. gives 2000 plants, and requires 
60 feet of ground. 

Lettuce. — i oz. gives 7000 plants and re- 
quires seed bed of 120 feet. 

Melon, — I oz. for 120 hills. 

Nasturtium. — i oz. sows 25 feet of row. 

Onion. — i oz. sows 200 feet of row. 

Okra. — I oz. sows 200 feet of row. 

Parsley. — i oz. sows 200 feet of row. 

Parsnips. — i oz. sows 250 feet of row. 

Pepper. — i oz. gives 2500 plants. 

Peas. — I quart sows 120 feet of row. 

Radish. — i oz. to 100 feet. 

Salsify. — i oz. to 50 feet of row. 

Spinach. — i oz. to 200 feet of row. 

Squash. — i oz. to 75 hills. 

Tomato. — i oz. gives 2500 plants, requir- 
ing seed bed of 80 feet. 

Turnip. — i oz. to 2000 feet. 

Watermelon. — i oz. to 50 hills. 



Estimated Quantities of Seed Required to the Acre. 



Wheat i^ 

Barley i^ 

Oats 2 

Rye I 

Buckwheat 3/ 

Millet I 

Corn i^ 

Beans i 

Peas 2y2\oi,% 

Hemp I to i>^ 

Flax >^ to 2 

Rice.... 2 to2^ 



to 2 


b 


ushels 


to 2>^ 






to 4 






to 2 






to i^X 






to 1% 






to I 






to 2 







Broom Corn X to 



bushels. 



Timothy 12 to 24 quarts. 

Mustard 8 to 20 

Herd Grass 12 to 16 " 

Flat Turnip 2 to 3 pounds. 

Red Clover 10 to 16 

White Clover 3 to 4 

Blue Grass 10 to 15 '* 

Orchard Grass 20 to 30 " 

Carrots. 4 to 5 " 

Parsnips 6 to 8 " 






IMPERIAL CHILLED PLOWS 




# 



PRFSS OF W. D. RCGER3 & CO 
RALTIiMORE. MD.